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Capturing images from a Microscope

From: Stefan Luger
Subject: Re: [roots] Microscope
Date: Monday, November 24, 2008, 10:39 AM

Would like to start a small discussion on microscope.
This weekend saw the demo of Seiler Microscope.
Was very much now interested in getting a Microscope.
Saw the Model 202 as had also suggested by Mr Stefan,
it costs about 3.15 lacs with camera and beam splitter.
Need inputs regarding it and what is the use of beam splitter.

You need three things to capture images from a Microscope.  You need a
beam-splitter which is inserted between the optical Pod and the Inclinable
Eyepieces. (By the way make sure you purchase inclinable as opposed to
angled or straight)  The beam-splitter has two ports, one on either side,
and it diverts some of the light (image) and sends it to the side of
the scope to the side ports.

Then you need a camera adapter. This connects up to the beam-splitter
port and connects to your camera.

Then of course you need a camera.


So it depends on which camera you want to get, which adapter you need. I am sure your representative will give you the guidance you need. Here is a picture of a dentist in the Washington DC area using a Model 202. This was taken about three years ago. The Model 202 that you will be getting is a newer version. So it depends on which camera you want to get, which adapter you need. I am sure your representative will give you the guidance you need. Here is a picture of a dentist in the Washington DC area using a Model 202. This was taken about three years ago. The Model 202 that you will be getting is a newer version. I would definitely recommend getting a video camera and some monitors to help with communication between you and your patient. It is like having in intra-oral camera but only better. Here is an example of what I mean: Here you see a dentist with a monitor over the patient so they can see and you will notice one on the far wall a monitor for the assistant so that she can see what he sees and therefore can anticipate his needs. This is very helpful for a variety of reasons. (Oh by the way, you see a few wires hanging off the scope. This is because we just hooked up the cameras that day when I was there, and we hadn't hidden the wires yet. Now they are hidden. This was taken during his training day.) Once you start using a scope, you will be amazed at the difference it makes. It will be frustrating to use at first because it doesn't follow all the rules for patient positioning that you learned in dental school. You do need training. Good Luck and enjoy your new found capabilities. Stefan Luger Microscope Consultant and Hands-on Training

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